The most effective model for education is Direct Instruction according to prof. Paul Kirschner. I have seen him a couple of times at ResearchED Amsterdam and if you follow his tweets, then you can be sure he will point out over and over again why Direct instruction is the way to go. I have never understood why people would want to go against the overwhelming evidence he presents. And he’s not alone. Many of his academic colleagues are eager to point out all the proof there is and sometimes take it a step further by bashing other forms of interaction either because they are based on neuromyths or some other form of unsound research. Yes, to these scholars the only way to interact with students seems to be the evidence-informed type of education.

 

Direct instruction seems to be the Holy Grail, but unfortunately, these advocates bash other forms of instruction and their underlying philosophy frequently. I.e. I read criticism about Carol Dweck’s Growth Mindset. I disagree because I use her research daily in the way I address my students. I have seen the difference in providing feedback from a Growth Mindset perspective. I have to give credit to Nienke Atteveld (@NvanAtteveldt) for sharing her research on this topic with us.

Recently a new study confirms the impact of Growth Mindset in Education.